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7 notes from the shocking January 6 session on Tuesday

7 notes from the shocking January 6 session on Tuesday 

The House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, Capitol Hill insurrection reconvened Tuesday for a hastily scheduled hearing, featuring blockbuster testimony from Trump White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson.

Hutchinson has cooperated extensively with the investigation, having sat for four closed-door depositions. She revealed how then-President Donald Trump and his inner circle were warned about the potential for violence on January 6, and how Trump wanted to join the throngs of his supporters at the US Capitol.


The testimony bolstered the narrative that the committee has been driving toward over the last few weeks: That Trump incited and supported the insurrection as part of a desperate power grab to steal a second term, and that many of his top advisers thought his schemes were illegal.
    Here are takeaways from Hutchinson's key testimony.

    Trump and his chief of staff were warned about violence -- including armed attendees of rally

    Hutchinson really moved the ball forward in terms of establishing that Trump was personally aware of the potential for violence, yet forged ahead on January 6 with his attempts to rile up his supporters to interfere with the joint session of Congress to certify President Joe Biden's victory.
    She said Trump was told that morning that weapons were being confiscated from some of his supporters who came for his rally. Later, when Trump and his team were at the Ellipse -- the large oval lawn on the south side of the White House -- and before his speech, Trump barked out orders to his staffers to "take the mags away" -- referring to the metal detectors -- because the people in the crowd, "they're not here to hurt me."

    When Hutchinson told her boss, Meadows, about early reports of weapons getting confiscated, Meadows didn't even look up from his phone, according to Hutchinson. Two days earlier, he told her that "things might get real, real, bad on January 6."
    "The potential for violence was learned or known before the onset of the violence, early enough for President Trump to have taken steps to prevent it," said Republican Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming, the panel's GOP vice chair. She added that Trump could have urged his supporters not to march to the Capitol, or condemned the violence more quickly, but didn't, because he "had something else in mind."

    Trump intended to go the Capitol and pushed to do so until the last minute

    The select committee effectively proved as much on Tuesday by featuring a mix of damning witness testimony and White House records that show Trump intended to join his supporters at the Capitol and was pushing to do so just minutes before the violence began to escalate.
    It was previously known that Trump wanted to go to the Capitol, but Hutchinson's testimony established for the first time that people around Trump had advance knowledge of this plan.